Incredible Years achieves “proven” rating

Incredible Years is a suite of programmes that target children up to age 12 who are at risk of, or who are exhibiting, conduct problems. The series has been given an overall rating of “proven” in a new programme summary from the Promising Practices Network, the highest rating they apply. The summary notes that studies of Incredible Years have generally focused on short-term effects, but that the handful of longer-term studies reviewed did show some significant extended effects of the programme. You can find out more about Incredible Years at the IEE conference, when Tracey Bywater (IEE), and Kevin Lawrence (Children’s Services Manager, Barnardo’s Cymru) will be running a session on the programme.

Source: Programs that work, Promising Practices Network.

SPORT programme achieves “promising” rating

The SPORT programme, which integrates physical activity and other health-enhancing habits with substance abuse prevention, has been rated “promising” by the US Promising Practices Network (PPN). According to a new PPN programme summary, a rigorous evaluation of SPORT showed that participants in the programme were less likely to start using alcohol and significantly more likely to exhibit self-control related to alcohol when compared to a control group.

An article about SPORT was featured in the spring 2012 issue of Better: Evidence-based Education, which focused on mind and body.

Sources: Programs that work (2013), Promising Practices Network
Promoting positive behaviours and self-image (2012), Better: Evidence-based Education

Raising expectations across the school

Talent Development Secondary (TDS) has been added to the Promising Practices Network’s (PPN) “Programs that Work” section, and is listed as a “Promising Program”. According to PPN’s programme overview, the TDS model seeks to enhance pupil achievement by raising expectations for both teachers and pupils. The goal of the model is to change the school climate by reorganising the school into smaller learning communities.

In these learning communities, pupils share a common set of peers and teachers across their time at secondary school, and course curricula are designed around a common, career-related theme. PPN has identified several evaluations of TDS that have shown the programme improves test scores, attendance, and course credits earned.

Source: Promising Practices Network (2012), Talent Development Secondary