Equipping students for an automated world

New research from the UCL Institute of Education (IOE), in partnership with Nesta, suggests that complex human traits like problem-solving and social skills will be the most sought-after in the future workplace, as these are the hardest to replicate in an automated world.

Rose Luckin and colleagues argue that giving children well-structured problems to solve together (collaborative problem solving), is an essential skill to learn in order to prepare them for the workplace of the future, and also reinforces knowledge and improves attainment. However, despite this, collaborative problem solving is rarely taught in schools. The report, Solved! Making the case for collaborative problem solving, suggests that the current education system is stifling such skills because it remains focused on memory and knowledge tasks, due mainly to the preference for individual assessment, concerns over behaviour management, and lack of training for teachers. It calls for policymakers, educators, and innovators to adapt to equip young people with the skills needed for the future and includes recommendations on how the education system can incorporate collaborative problem solving.

Source: Solved! Making the case for collaborative problem solving (March 2017), Nesta