No impact for inquiry-based learning intervention

The Education Endowment Foundation has published an evaluation of an inquiry-based learning intervention – CREST Silver Award.

Delivered by the British Science Association, the CREST programme aims to help pupils engage with science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) subjects by allowing them to develop their own project ideas. Eighty secondary schools in London and the south east took part in the trial, involving 2,810 Year 9 pupils (ages 13–14). While CREST can normally be delivered by any STEM department in the school, for the trial, CREST was delivered by the science department in each school. Schools had the flexibility to decide how they would deliver CREST (for example, as a whole class activity or as a STEM club) and when they would run the programme (during school, after school, lunch break, or during class time). Pupils were expected to complete 30 hours of project work in total.

The independent evaluation by NatCen found that pupils who took part in the programme made no additional progress in science achievement (as measured by the Progress Test in Science) compared to similar pupils who were not offered the programme (effect size = -0.01). Nor was there any evidence that the CREST Silver Award improved self-efficacy in science or increased the percentage of pupils aspiring to a STEM career; however, small positive impacts were found for pupil confidence and attitudes toward school.

Source: CREST Silver: Evaluation report (December 2019), Education Endowment Foundation

Schools and parents influence well-being

A new report commissioned by the Department of Health has sought to identify factors that predict well-being throughout people’s lives. Data about well-being in early childhood was taken from questions asked to seven-year-olds as part of the Millennium Cohort Study. Findings include that children tend to have higher levels of well-being when they have good social relationships with family and friends, do things that they find enjoyable, experience moderation in activities that are potentially harmful to health, and have parents who do not shout or smack them. The authors suggest that this supports the current emphasis on extending the reach of parenting programmes and anti-bullying initiatives. Schools may also have a role to play in promoting positive health behaviours.

Information on teenagers was taken from the “Understanding Society” annual longitudinal survey. The findings suggest that subjective well-being declines steeply with age at this stage of life, with only 8% of 15-year-olds having high well-being compared to 24% of 11-year-olds. Substance use and excessive computer gaming become more common, and both are associated with lower levels of well-being. As with younger children, social relations are influential. A secure environment at school – free from bullying and classroom disruption – was linked to well-being in teenagers, as was feeling supported at home and sharing family meals. The report does not imply causation. For example, it is not possible to tell whether adolescents with low well-being play computer games, or whether playing computer games results in low well-being.

Source: Predicting Wellbeing (2013), NatCen Social Research.

Evaluation of children’s centres in England

The Evaluation of Children’s Centres in England (ECCE) is a six year study, commissioned by the Department for Education and undertaken by NatCen Social Research, the University of Oxford and Frontier Economics, that aims to provide an in-depth understanding of children’s centre services, their effectiveness and cost efficiency in delivering different types of services. In this first report from the study, children’s centres in the most deprived areas are examined using the responses from a survey of children’s centre leaders conducted in July and September 2011.

The report shows the changing environment in which children’s centres operate with 40 per cent experiencing recent cuts in services or staffing, and many leaders managing two or more centres. The subsequent outputs from this study will examine children’s centres’ service delivery, multiagency working and reach, impact analysis, cost benefit analysis, and the families using them.

Source: Evaluation of Children’s Centres in England (2012), Department for Education