Evidence, evidence, evidence

In a recent speech, and an article in The Times, Shadow Education Secretary, Stephen Twigg MP, has outlined his commitment to “evidence, evidence, evidence”.

He proposes the creation of an “Office for Educational Improvement, independent of ministers, along the lines of the Office for Budgetary Responsibility that was set up by this Government.”

Mentioning the Coalition for Evidence-based Education (CEBE), he notes that “Teachers rarely have time to look at research and academics don’t always see the relevance of their work to the classroom so I will look at how we can work with organisations such as [CEBE].”

CEBE is an alliance of researchers, policy makers, and practitioners who share an interest in reforming the way research evidence is used in policy and practice.

Source: Evidence, not dogma: a smart way to raise education standards (2012), Labour

Educational television can support early literacy

This study from Early Childhood Research Quarterly tested whether a literacy curriculum supplement integrated with media can improve literacy outcomes for young children. The curriculum supplement incorporated video clips from programmes such as Sesame Street as well as online games, hands-on activities and professional development.

Findings showed that the supplement had positive impacts on children’s ability to recognise letters, sounds of letters and initial sounds of words, and children’s concepts of story and print.

Source: Supplementing literacy instruction with a media-rich intervention: Results of a randomized controlled trial (2012), Early Childhood Research Quarterly,27(1)

Parliamentary event builds support for Education Media Centre

More than 70 policymakers, journalists, educators, and researchers attended a parliamentary event in November to hear more about the new Education Media Centre (EMC), a project of the Coalition for Evidence-Based Education. The EMC aims to capture and spread knowledge about what works in education, by directly supporting the national media.

Speakers talked about how the EMC will provide journalists and policy-makers with authoritative, independent, and accessible insights from education research, and so help them base their work on robust evidence. It will link journalists with expert researchers and solid evidence in a language that they can understand and within the timescales they need. The aim is to raise the quality of information that teachers and the general public receive through policy makers and the press, and so improve practice in classrooms and outcomes for children. You can read more about the EMC here

Source: Coalition for Evidence-based Education