Do evidence-based programmes work in every context?

Researchers from The Social Research Unit at Dartington, along with the Universities of Exeter and York, have analysed the impact of three evidence-based programmes implemented in Birmingham as part of the city’s “Brighter Futures” strategy. A new article describing their findings illustrates that context matters.

The three programmes evaluated were the Incredible Years BASIC parenting programme, PATHS (Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies), and the Triple-P parenting programme. In each case, a randomised controlled trial was conducted with validated standardised measures. The findings were as follows:

  • Incredible Years yielded reductions in negative parenting behaviours among parents, reductions in child behaviour problems, and improvements in children’s relationships.
  • In the PATHS trial, modest improvements in emotional health and behavioural development after one year disappeared by the end of year two.
  • There were no effects for Triple-P.

The authors suggest that much can be learned from the strengths and limitations of the Birmingham experience.

Source: The impact of three evidence-based programmes delivered in public systems in Birmingham, UK (2012), International Journal of Conflict and Violence, 6(2).

Excellent results with Incredible Years

The online magazine Prevention Action has published a report on Incredible Years. This evidence-based parent training programme has previously been proven to achieve considerable success in improving outcomes for children aged three to eight years old with challenging behaviours.

New research has shown it also produces positive results with older children and their families. Studies of Incredible Years in Ireland, and also of the programme’s therapeutic dinosaur, for small groups of children at high risk of developing conduct disorder, are also underway.

Source: Incredible results for the Incredible Years (2011), Prevention Action