Long-term impacts of KIPP middle schools

The Knowledge Is Power Program (KIPP) is the largest network of public charter schools in the US, serving more than 100,000 pupils across a network of more than 240 schools. KIPP schools predominantly educate low-income pupils from underserved communities, with the goal of closing achievement gaps and preparing pupils to succeed in college.

In this Mathematica report, Thomas Coen and colleagues present the results of a long-term tracking study that follows 1,177 pupils who applied to enter 1 of 13 oversubscribed KIPP middle schools through a 5th or 6th grade (Year 6 or 7) admissions lottery ten years ago.

The study found that pupils who won a place at a KIPP middle school through the admission lottery were six percentage points more likely to enrol in a four-year college programme within two years of finishing high school than pupils who lost the lottery. After adjusting for those pupils who actually attended a KIPP school after receiving an offer (only 68% of the lottery recipients actually attended a KIPP school), the impact estimate increased to 12.9 percentage points.

The study also tracked the pupils who enrolled in college immediately after high school, and examined whether they remained in college programmes over the next two years. Pupils who attended KIPP middle schools were more likely to still be enrolled in college after two years (33%) than similar pupils who did not attend KIPP middle schools (24%). However, although rates of entering college immediately and then continuing for two years were higher for KIPP pupils, this difference was not large enough to be statistically significant.

Source:  Long-term impacts of KIPP middle schools on college enrollment and early college persistence (September 2019), Mathematica

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