Best practices for informing policy-makers about research

A new report from Child Trends reviews the literature on conditions under which US policy-makers are most likely to use research, including the presentation formats that best facilitate their use. The authors, Elizabeth Jordan and P Mae Cooper, offer several insights based on their review of the evidence, including:

  • Policy-makers prefer a personal connection or conversation to a written report. One reason the authors cite is that reports are undigested information, meaning they require some expertise to pull out the information that is most relevant to the situation at hand.
  • While personal connections are usually best, no legislator can build and maintain relationships with experts in every field. The authors say that usually it is legislative staffers who fill this gap. Reports that summarise findings from a body of research are particularly useful to staffers, as they cover a variety of topics at one time.
  • For research to be useful to policy-makers and their staff, it must be relevant. The authors note that the information must relate to current policy debates, show an impact on “real people”, present information that is useful across states or localities, and be easy to read.
  • There are some formatting decisions that can help improve a written report’s accessibility. The authors suggest bulleted lists, highlighted text, charts, and graphs to help a policy-maker or staffer quickly absorb the main points of the research.

The report also provides several real-life examples of how research has informed public policy. For instance, the authors describe how rigorous evidence of the short- and long-term positive outcomes for children and families who participated in early childhood home visiting led the Obama Administration to create a new federal home visiting programme.

Source: Building bridges: How to share research about children and youth with policymakers (2016), Child Trends

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