Urban violence and pupil performance

A new study published in Sociology of Education finds that children who attend school with many pupils from violent neighbourhoods can earn significantly lower test scores than peers with classmates from safer areas. The lead author of the study was sociologist Julia Burdick-Will from Johns Hopkins University.

Burdick-Will studied pupils who attended Chicago Public Schools from 2002 to 2010, analysing administrative data from the school system, crime statistics from the Chicago Police Department and school surveys from the University of Chicago Consortium on Chicago School Research. She looked at five cohorts of pupils who were freshmen (Year 10) between the autumn of 2002 and 2006, and followed each pupil for up to four years. Results indicated that in schools where more pupils have a high exposure to violence, their classmates score as much as 10 percent lower on annual standardised maths and reading tests.

According to the report, the study shows that when pupils experience higher levels of neighbourhood violence, the whole school reports feeling less safe, having more disciplinary problems and feeling less trust in their teachers.

Source: Neighborhood violence, peer effects, and academic achievement in Chicago (June 2018), Sociology of Education DOI: 10.1177/0038040718779063

 

Straight talk on evidence

The Laura and John Arnold Foundation (LJAF), which sponsors the US version of Best Evidence in Brief, has launched a new initiative called Straight Talk on Evidence.

The purpose of the initiative is to “distinguish credible findings of programme effectiveness from the many others that claim to be, through an easy-to-read, no-spin digest of recent programme evaluation findings.”

For example, the site presents highlights of a report on preventing youth crime. LJAF reviewed a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of Reading for Life, a mentoring and character development programme for young offenders in the US. The review found this to be a well-conducted RCT, showing that the programme reduced the rate of subsequent re-arrests. The study’s main limitation is that it was conducted in a single town in Indiana.

Source: Promising new evidence in the effort to prevent youth crime (August 2017), Straight Talk on Evidence