Effect of preschool home visiting on school readiness

A study published in JAMA Pediatrics examines the sustained effects of a preschool home visiting programme on child outcomes in third grade (Year 4). Karen Bierman and colleagues conducted a randomised controlled trial of the Research-Based and Developmentally Informed Parent home visiting program (REDI-P) on 200 families with preschool children recruited from 24 Head Start centres in Pennsylvania.

Families were assigned to either receive the REDI-P intervention or be sent maths learning games in the post (control group). The intervention focused on improving academic performance and social-emotional adjustment, and reducing children’s problems at home. Families received ten visits from home visitors during preschool and six follow-up visits in kindergarten. Parents received coaching to enhance parent–child relationships and home learning materials to support children’s development and school readiness.

Overall, REDI-P produced sustained benefits four years after the intervention, with children in the REDI-P intervention group needing and using fewer school services than children in the control group. Results showed improvements in academic performance in third grade, measured by direct assessments of child sight-word reading fluency (effect size = +0.28) and teacher-rated academic performance in third grade (effect size= +0.29). The intervention also promoted sustained improvements in children’s social-emotional adjustment, reflected in direct assessments of social understanding (effect size = +0.31). REDI-P also produced reductions in the home problems that parents reported (effect size= −0.28).

Source: Effect of Preschool Home Visiting on School Readiness and Need for Services in Elementary School: A Randomized Clinical TrialJAMA Pediatr. 2018;172(8):e181029.

Evidence on the long-term effects of home visiting programmes

Children from low-income families are more likely than those from higher-income families to have poor social, emotional, cognitive, behavioural and health outcomes. One approach that has helped parents and their young children is home visiting, which provides information, resources and support to expectant parents and families with young children.

This MDRC brief summarises prior evidence on the effects of four evidence-based models of home visiting using information from seven studies of families with children aged 5- to 21-years-old. Specifically, the brief looks at what the effects of home visiting are for families as children get older, and how the monetary benefits of home visiting compare with their costs.

  • The key findings of the report include:
    Evidence-based home visiting has improved outcomes for parents and children across a wide range of child ages, outcome areas, and national models.
  • Evidence-based home visiting appears to be cost-effective in the long term.
  • The largest benefits from evidence-based home visiting come through reduced spending on government programmes and increased individual earnings.

The information in this brief will inform the design of a study to assess the long-term effects of home visiting. It will suggest where this long-term follow-up study can seek to replicate prior results, where it can try to fill gaps in current knowledge, and which outcomes are important to measure in order to assess the benefits and costs of home visiting.

Source: Evidence on the long-term effects of home visiting programs: Laying the groundwork for long- term follow-up in the mother and infant home visiting program evaluation (MIHOPE). (September 2017), OPRE Report 2017-73, MDRC