The world’s largest school-based mental health programmes

School-based mental health programmes are now delivered to millions of children, particularly in high-income countries.

J Michael Murphy and colleagues have published a review of those programmes that reach the largest populations. In an article for the Harvard Review of Psychiatry, they profile eight programmes that have shown their effectiveness using randomised controlled trials or quasi-experimental studies. Most of the programmes focus on primary prevention or target specific vulnerable populations, rather than being aimed at supporting children with diagnosed disorders.

For each of the programmes, there is a description of its approach and a review of the supporting evidence. The eight programmes are:

  • Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports
  • FRIENDS
  • Positive Action
  • Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS)
  • Skills for Life
  • MindMatters
  • Good Behavior Game
  • Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools

Between them, the programmes have reached more than 25 million children, although the authors point out that these have mainly been in high-income countries. There is limited evidence that these programmes could be implemented at scale in low- and middle-income countries.

The authors suggest that, with the growing availability and diversity of programmes, greater attention can now be paid to assessing the processes and practices of implementation that are associated with successful, widely disseminated and sustainable programmes.

Source: Scope, scale, and dose of the world’s largest school-based mental health programs (August 2017), Harvard Review of Psychiatry

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