Alleviating parental depression

A new article published in BMC Health Services Research looks at the impact of the Incredible Years (IY) parenting programmes on parental depression and service use. IY aims to reduce conduct disorder in children and depression in their parents, two issues that are often apparent in the same family. Recent trials in the UK and Ireland have focused on the effects of the programme on children, but less was known about the effects on parents.

The authors explored parental depression and service use (and the associated costs) after attending a 12-week, group-based IY Basic Parenting programme. They conducted a secondary analysis of data gathered in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of the programme. The original RCT sample consisted of 153 (Intervention N=104, Control N=49) parents of children aged 3–4 years old (at baseline) living in 11 disadvantaged Sure Start areas in north and mid Wales.

Depression scores were compared over time for the intervention and control groups. The authors found that parental depression decreased at six months for both the intervention and control groups; however, this decrease was only significant for the intervention group. The differences between intervention and control groups were not significant.

The article also looked at service use costs (primary services such as GPs and health visitors; social services; and hospital services). The parents in the trial accessed a high number of services, particularly in primary health. Total mean costs of service use for the intervention group increased at six and eighteen months post-baseline; however, costs decreased at twelve months post-baseline. Parents who scored above the “clinical level” of self-reported depression in both the intervention and control groups accessed more health and social services than those who were below the clinical level for concern.

Source: Parental Depression and Child Conduct Problems: Evaluation of Parental Service Use and Associated Costs After Attending the Incredible Years Basic Parenting Programme (2014), BMC Health Services Research, 13.

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